Employment Law Explained

Author Archives: Guest

About Guest

Here are my most recent posts

Working in the UK – Negotiating the Minefield

 

 

Although immigration remains a hot topic, the current government has been at pains to stress (most recently in the Queen’s Speech) that it wishes to “attract people who will contribute and deter those who will not”. It is also noticeable that none of the forthcoming immigration legislation  that has been announced is aimed at legal workers – although penalties for those who employ illegal workers will be increased.

Nevertheless, the simplicity that was supposed to accompany the ‘points-based’ system (PBS) of immigration when it was progressively introduced from 2008 to replace the previous work permit and entry schemes has been elusive, since continuous tinkering with the system means that the rules remain complex and, at times, difficult to understand.

Failing to Overcome Competing Employment Balances: British Courts

Striking a balance between religious human rights and corporate image can be tough. Even schools are squabbling over whether pupils should be allowed to wear hijabs and turbans in class, as it’s against the school uniform policy.

 

When British Airways check-in employee, Nadia Eweida, was asked to remove her cross at work, this orthodox Coptic Christian decided to take the matter to the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR), Strasbourg. As a result, she was awarded £1,600 in compensation and granted the right to wear her symbol of faith in the workplace.

 

Dealing with Redundancy

 

Being made redundant is undoubtedly a difficult and distressing time. Many people often feel unsupported and alone when trying to navigate through the process of identifying a possible alternative to replace lost income and work.

However it’s important to know that you’re far from powerless in the face of redundancy and in fact there’s plenty you can do to fight your corner.

Your legal rights

Charities: Do you have Measures in Place to Counteract Fraud?

 

Few organisations have failed to be affected by the recession, which continues to grip firms across the UK. Unfortunately, the downturn is also causing financial problems for charitable organisations, which usually tend to be unaffected by economic peaks and troughs.

As charities throughout Britain struggle to balance the books, increased red tape and fraudulent activities are causing additional headaches. Any person who is responsible for a charity should ask whether sufficient measures have been implemented to counteract fraud at a time when goodwill is needed more than ever.

Fraud

 

Exploitation or Experience? Why Unpaid Legal Internships Are Rocking The Legal Profession

Sponsored Guest Post by Hibberts Solicitors, Crewe

 Experience is very important in the legal profession. Training-contract applicants who have failed to undertake any relevant work experience stand little chance of landing an interview with a magic-circle law firm. Prospective lawyers often spend their summers working for legal organisations as paid interns, but not all internships come with a salary – some undergraduates are required to gain experience without earning a penny.

Minimum Wage